Campaigns

Social Marketing / Social Norm Campaigns

Research has established that students grossly overestimate the number of peers who engage in alcohol consumption and drug use.  The misperception is believed to influence student behavior – feeling pressure to drink or use drugs because everyone else is doing it. 

The idea behind social norms marketing campaigns is to turn the dynamic around using media, posters, banners and fun activities (such as games) to inform students about the true levels of alcohol consumption and drug use.  The actual levels are much lower than students perceive them to be.  Having accurate information leads to changes in perceptions of drinking and drug norms and in turn leads to fewer students engaging in high risk alcohol and drug use.

Scare Tactics

Don’t work especially with youth – memorable does not always equal effective.  Youth often experiment with drugs and alcohol without serious negative consequences so they discount or ignore the message.  Scare tactics can stigmatize vulnerable populations and harm unintended audiences. 

Weymouth Youth Coalition Annual Sticker Shock Campaign and Weymouth Youth Coalition Annual Takeout Food Campaign

To raise public awareness about the minimum drinking age law and to discourage adults from providing alcohol to minors during Thanksgiving week when alcohol sales are brisk and alcohol related crime is high.  Students affix 200 stickers on bags and hang up to 6 posters in each store at package stores and restaurant throughout Weymouth.  Posters are also hung at Chapman Middle School and Weymouth High School.

Sample Stickers and posters:

 

National Family Day Campaign

The Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia (CASA) launched Family Day in 2001 after research consistently found that the more often children eat dinner with their parents, the less likely they are to smoke, drink or use illicit drugs.

As a result, cities and towns across the United States declare and celebrate the fourth Monday in September as National Family Day, a Day to Eat Dinner with Your Children.

Because frequent family dining is associated with lower rates of teen smoking, drinking, illegal drug use and prescription drug use, Weymouth participates in the annual National Family Day Campaign.

In 2008, Mayor Sue Kay made a proclamation that Weymouth will recognize the fourth Monday in September as National Family Day.   The coalition holds various contests throughout the town and sends fliers home with students in grades K – 6. 

 

Red Ribbon Campaign

“The Red Ribbon, A Story of Hope,” was the inspiration for the “Red Ribbon campaign.”  

The author, John Lasne, tells the story of a troubled kingdom.   People in the village are terribly unhappy and the King realizes he must do something.   A simple village weaver comes up with an idea to save the kingdom as long as everyone is included

Happiness is restored when the weaver’s magical red ribbon brings people together and inspires them to help one another.  The villagers and the King discover that the magic is not in the ribbon at all, but in the “hands and hearts of those who embrace it.”.

The story depicts how collective abilities can better a community.  The Red Ribbon is symbolic of how young people can be protected from the harms of substance abuse and disease when a community supports prevention and community service efforts. 

The "W" symbol was developed to promote substance abuse prevention and wellness in Weymouth.  The symbol enables residents, employers and employees to identify community wellness and prevention programs.

Safety Officer Joe Favreau reads the story in every 3rd grade classroom.

Volunteers have read the story to other groups of children during:

  • “Read Across America Week” 
  • “Red Ribbon Week.”  at the Tufts Library 
  • Wey Care summer program 

Songs and a craft activity are part of the program.

 

National Family Day Campaign

What is the National Family Day Campaign?

The Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia (CASA) launched Family Day in 2001 after research consistently found that the more often children eat dinner with their parents, the less likely they are to smoke, drink or use illicit drugs.

As a result, cities and towns across the United States declare and celebrate the fourth Monday in September as National Family Day, a Day to Eat Dinner with Your Children.

Why Weymouth Participates

Because frequent family dining is associated with lower rates of teen smoking, drinking, illegal drug use and prescription drug use, Weymouth participates in the annual National Family Day Campaign.

How We Participate

In 2008, Mayor Sue Kay made a proclamation that Weymouth will recognize the fourth Monday in September as National Family Day.   The coalition holds various contests throughout the town and sends fliers home with students in grades K – 6. 

Share the Facts

Compared to kids who have fewer than three family dinners per week, children and teens who have frequent family dinners are:

  • At 70 percent lower risk for substance abuse
  • Half as likely to try cigarettes or marijuana; one third less likely to try alcohol and half as likely to get drunk monthly
  • Almost 40 percent likelier to say future drug use will never happen
  • Teens that have frequent family dinners are likelier to get better grades in school and have parents who take responsibility for teen drug use